Arlene is on the SCENE

Posts Tagged ‘pbs

There is a movement afoot to make disability rights and disability history part of the standard curriculum. I just came across an e-petition that is making its way around the United Kingdom. California recently passed the Fair Education Act which requires the history curriculum to include contributions made by people with disabilities. As with other minority groups who are sometimes misunderstood and mistreated by the majority, teaching everyone about the history of all groups will only enhance understanding and respect.

And Marybeth and I were thinking the same thing! As you’ve read in previous posts, we’re currently editing the sequel to Arlene On the Scene. It should be available next spring (we’ll keep you posted!). One of the things we wanted to include in this book is a taste of disability rights history, so that students will be encouraged to research this topic and learn more.

Check out the sneak peek from Arlene, Rebel Queen below! (It’s unedited; please excuse any mistakes!)

Here’s the background: Arlene and her classmates were assigned a project in which they had to research a law that changed our country. Arlene read about the Americans With Disabilities Act. Of course, for her report, she did things a little differently. You know how Arlene loves to rap…

But first, after lunch, it was time for Jessie and me to do our presentation thing.  And my thing is poetry.

I smiled at the class, then went right into it.  By the end, they were all clapping out a beat for me!

“Let me tell you ‘bout a girl named Jennifer Keelan

You know she can’t walk, she got around by wheelin’

She made the prez and politicians feel a funny feelin’

When they watched her climb a hundred steps, all while kneelin’

At the top she gave a paper to some pol-i-ticians

Saying we got rights in spite of a disease or condition

Her picture made the papers, but in the late edition

And she forced the president to make a quick decision

Before the ADA was passed, it was a-okay

To treat disabled folks like they should just be locked away

But now malls, halls, clubs, buses, and cafes

Have to open up the doors that once blocked our way.

The words ‘We the People’ aren’t a mystery

We have rights, freedom and of course, liberty.

By making civil rights include disability

The ADA marked its rightful place in history.”

 

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Arlene On the Scene is proudly sponsored by the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation.

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